Johns Hopkins researchers slow cancer growth with drugs

BY KRISTY DOUGLAS | PUBLISHED: 06-19-2017

Approximately 90% of cancer deaths occur only after metastasis, according to Jayatilaka, who said that she and her colleagues first made a breakthrough when they discovered two proteins.

Most cancers become fatal when the cancer cells spread throughout the body, but researchers at Johns Hopkins University said they may have found a way to slow or even stop the cells from spreading via some existing prescription medications. The researchers, led by recent PhD graduate Hasini Jayatilaka, managed to slow the process of tumors multiplying and spreadingknown in medical parlance as "metastasis"in lab mice.

"A female patient with breast cancer doesn't succumb to the disease just because she has a mass on her breast; she succumbs to the disease because [when] it spreads either to the lungs, the liver, the brain, it becomes untreatable," said Jayatilaka, who completed her doctorate in chemical and biomolecular engineering this spring. "What we came up with through our studies was this drug cocktail that could potentially inhibit the spread of cancer."
Approximately 90% of cancer deaths occur only after metastasis, according to Jayatilaka, who said that she and her colleagues first made a breakthrough when they discovered two proteinsInterleukin 6 and Interleuken 8that start the metastasis process. A tumor's cells release these proteins when the tumor reaches a certain size.

The researchers then discovered that metastasis in mice who had cancer slowed substantially when the mice received a combination of drugs. Those drugs were Tocilizumab, which treats rheumatoid arthritis; and Reparixin, a newer medication now undergoing testing for cancer treatment.

The drugs did not stop metastasis completely, but the researchers hope that they might with some further testing and enhancements. But the researchers will need to devise some human clinical trials of the medications first, they said

 

 

Comments
Ian Marsh - 28 minutes ago
Approximately 90% of cancer deaths occur only after metastasis, according to Jayatilaka, who said that she and her colleagues first made a breakthrough when they discovered two proteins.
Wilson Soto - 35 minutes ago
Approximately 90% of cancer deaths occur only after metastasis, according to Jayatilaka, who said that she and her colleagues first made a breakthrough when they discovered two proteins.
Delila James - 38 minutes ago
Approximately 90% of cancer deaths occur only after metastasis, according to Jayatilaka, who said that she and her colleagues first made a breakthrough when they discovered two proteins.
Andrew McDonald - Aug 19, 2017
Approximately 90% of cancer deaths occur only after metastasis, according to Jayatilaka, who said that she and her colleagues first made a breakthrough when they discovered two proteins.
Adam Widmer - Aug 19, 2017
Approximately 90% of cancer deaths occur only after metastasis, according to Jayatilaka, who said that she and her colleagues first made a breakthrough when they discovered two proteins.
Billy Kirk - Aug 19, 2017
Approximately 90% of cancer deaths occur only after metastasis, according to Jayatilaka, who said that she and her colleagues first made a breakthrough when they discovered two proteins.
Joseph Scalise - Aug 19, 2017
Approximately 90% of cancer deaths occur only after metastasis, according to Jayatilaka, who said that she and her colleagues first made a breakthrough when they discovered two proteins.