Light drinking during pregnancy may not be as bad as previously thought, UK study suggests

BY BILLY KIRK | PUBLISHED: 09-14-2017

In fact, the team found no definitive proof that light drinking as laid out by the guidelines caused any severe or lasting damage to the unborn child. However, they did find some links to other complications.

A team of researchers at Bristol University have found that there is "surprisingly limited" evidence that light drinking during pregnancy leads to complications, according to a brand new study published in the journal BMJ Open.

The risks of heavy drinking during pregnancy are well documented. It can lead to miscarriages, premature birth, and cause both mental and physical problems for the baby. However, there have never been any studies done on safe amounts women can drink while pregnant.
The researchers expanded on that topic bylooking at all available studies done on pregnant drinking since the 1950's. This showed how little scientists know about the subject, and revealed that a drink or two may not be as harmful as many believe.

In fact, the team found no definitive proof that light drinking as laid out by the guidelines caused any severe or lasting damage to the unborn child. However, they did find some links to other complications.

"[E]ven light alcohol consumption in pregnancy is associated with risk of delivering a small baby and, to some extent, also with the risk of premature delivery, although this was less clear," said lead author Loubaba Mamluk, a researcher at the University of Bristol, according to CBS News.

The point of the research is not to prove that drinking during pregnancy is ok, but rather to shed new light into an area that may not be that well understood. The findings could also reassure women who have had small amounts to drink during pregnancy that they likely did not harm their child.

This new research comes just one year after Chief Medical Officer for the UK, Dame Sally Davies, changed her guidelines to support a total abstinence from drinking during pregnancy. Prior to the shift, pregnant women were told they could have one or two units -- equivalent to one or two small glasses of wine -- a week. This study once again calls the new rules into question.

Even so, the team in the study states that the new evidence does not mean drinking during pregnancy is safe. In fact, they stress that women should still avoid any alcohol during their nine months.The new findings do not aim to encourage women to drink during pregnancy. They merely give new evidence to a situation and may help women better understand what is safe and what is not in the coming years.

"A precautionary approach is still reasonable, but with luck this should dispel any guilt and anxiety felt by women who have an occasional glass of wine while they are pregnant," said David Spiegelhalter, a researcher at the University of Cambridge who was not involved in the study, according to BBC News

 

 

Comments
Laurel Kornfeld - Sep 19, 2017
In fact, the team found no definitive proof that light drinking as laid out by the guidelines caused any severe or lasting damage to the unborn child. However, they did find some links to other complications.
Laurel Kornfeld - Sep 19, 2017
In fact, the team found no definitive proof that light drinking as laid out by the guidelines caused any severe or lasting damage to the unborn child. However, they did find some links to other complications.
Wilson Soto - Sep 19, 2017
In fact, the team found no definitive proof that light drinking as laid out by the guidelines caused any severe or lasting damage to the unborn child. However, they did find some links to other complications.
Dan Taylor - Sep 19, 2017
In fact, the team found no definitive proof that light drinking as laid out by the guidelines caused any severe or lasting damage to the unborn child. However, they did find some links to other complications.
Laurel Kornfeld - Sep 18, 2017
In fact, the team found no definitive proof that light drinking as laid out by the guidelines caused any severe or lasting damage to the unborn child. However, they did find some links to other complications.
Joseph Scalise - Sep 18, 2017
In fact, the team found no definitive proof that light drinking as laid out by the guidelines caused any severe or lasting damage to the unborn child. However, they did find some links to other complications.
Joyce Clark - Sep 16, 2017
In fact, the team found no definitive proof that light drinking as laid out by the guidelines caused any severe or lasting damage to the unborn child. However, they did find some links to other complications.