New research says that women fancy men who look like their brother

BY CLIFF MOONEYHAM | PUBLISHED: 05-15-2017

Participants chose the picture of the partner as the one that was most similar to the brother 27 percent of the time, which is only s bit higher than random chance.

It has long been believed that women tend to choose men who look like their fathers.

But now new research has found women are more attracted to men who resemble their brothers.
Scientists found there was "clear evidence" for similarities between the looks of women's brothers and their partners.

Although the thought of being in a relationship with someone that looks like your male sibling could be a tad disturbing, dating someone who looks like them could have a genetic advantage.

Scientists at Northumbria University asked volunteers to rank the facial similarities between the boyfriends and brothers of randomly selected women.

According to Dr. Tamsin Saxton from Northumbria University, 32 women were requested to pass on details of the study to their brother and male partner, who in turn supplied photographs of themselves.

The 32 brothers were aged 18-40, while the partners were aged 20-37.

Also, a researcher was asked to locate online 48 recent photographs 24 brothers and 24 partners of brothers and partners of public figures or celebrities.

Participants were issued with a piece of paper with a photo of the brother of a woman and four other men one of whom was her partner.

The study subjects were then asked to say which of the other four men resembled the brother the most.

The scientists discovered clear evidence for perceptual similarity in facial photographs of a woman's partner and her brother.

"Although siblings themselves are sexually aversive, sibling resemblance is not," the researchers wrote in the paper, which is published In Evolution and Human Behaviour.

According to the researchers, "faces that subtly resemble family members could present useful clues to a potential reproductive partner with an optimal level of genetic dissimilarity."

Participants chose the picture of the partner as the one that was most similar to the brother 27 percent of the time, which is only s bit higher than random chance.

 

 

 

Comments
Jose Jefferies - Jul 21, 2017
Participants chose the picture of the partner as the one that was most similar to the brother 27 percent of the time, which is only s bit higher than random chance.
Jason Spencer - Jul 20, 2017
Participants chose the picture of the partner as the one that was most similar to the brother 27 percent of the time, which is only s bit higher than random chance.
James Carlin - Jul 18, 2017
Participants chose the picture of the partner as the one that was most similar to the brother 27 percent of the time, which is only s bit higher than random chance.
Harry Marcolis - Jul 18, 2017
Participants chose the picture of the partner as the one that was most similar to the brother 27 percent of the time, which is only s bit higher than random chance.
Linda Mack - Jul 18, 2017
Participants chose the picture of the partner as the one that was most similar to the brother 27 percent of the time, which is only s bit higher than random chance.
James Smith - Jul 17, 2017
Participants chose the picture of the partner as the one that was most similar to the brother 27 percent of the time, which is only s bit higher than random chance.
Harry Marcolis - Jul 17, 2017
Participants chose the picture of the partner as the one that was most similar to the brother 27 percent of the time, which is only s bit higher than random chance.